The Druid's Garden

Spiritual Journeys in Tending the Land, Permaculture, Wildcrafting, and Sustainable Living

Incense Recipies for Bards and Bardic Studies November 30, 2012

About a year ago, I posted some general guidelines for how to make incense.  This post describes incense recipes for those studying bardic courses or engaging in bardic activity.  I suggest growing and/or wildharvesting as much of your ingredients as you possibly can (ethically, of course). This allows not only for more sustainable incense making, but also for you to work with the energies of the plants throughout the process.  See my previous post for more information. My next three posts will provide incense recipes for bards, ovates, and druids, as well as some other miscellaneous stuff.  These recipes were created by myself and members of my grove; some of them were adapted from other sources (as noted) and the rest are fully original creations.  I hope you enjoy!

Notes: Cone/stick incenses form a incense clay that you can then shape into cones, sticks, spirals etc.  They need about a week of drying time before you use them.  If your incense doesn’t burn, or won’t stay burning after lit, it needs more woody materials (base materials).  Please see my earlier post for more details.  Powder incenses must be burnt on a charcoal block; they will not burn by themselves.

 

Elemental Balance Recipe (Cone/stick)

A woody and calming incense; one that provides balance and strength.

  • 10 parts Cedar (Fire); Woody base
  • 6 parts Sandalwood (Water); Woody base
  • 1 part Honeysuckle (Earth); aromatic
  • ½ part lemongrass essential oil (Air); aromatic

To bind:

  • 1 part Guar Gum (Binder) (Guar Gum can be purchased through a health food store)
  • Water to make the incense into a firm dough

Powder all ingredients very, very finely, adding the oil at the very end of the grinding process.  Once all ingredients are ready, you can add Guar Gum, mixing well. Add enough water to create a firm dough–if you use too much water, you can add more cedar or sandalwood powder.  Once your dough resembles play-dough or sculpey, you can roll out and cut, or shape into small incense cones/blocks/sticks.  Allow it to dry for 1 week and then store in a nice container with a piece of quartz.  Quartz represents creativity and spirit!

Elemental balance!  (Image from my Tarot of Trees, www.tarotoftrees.com)

Elemental balance! (Image from my Tarot of Trees, http://www.tarotoftrees.com)

Awen (Creativity) Incense #1 (Powder)

This incense calls forth the Awen within.

  • ½ part sweetgrass (call spirit helpers)
  • ½ part cinnamon (success, power, passion, empowering)
  • 1 part vanilla
  • 1 part powdered/dried ginger (fire, passion, personal growth)
  • 2 parts frankincense (fire, clairvoyance/clear sight, good luck, success, transformation, inspiration)
  • ½ part yarrow (earth, bringing things forth)

Mix all ingredients in a mortar and pestle and then burn on a charcoal block.

Inspiration Awen Incense #2 (honey nugget, needs charcoal block)

This incense uses honey as a binder.  It has a longer “wait time” until it is usable (several months) and it is burnt on a charcoal block.  But once you wait, it’s a wonderful, wonderful incense for artistic pursuits!

  • 8 parts cedar
  • ½ part clove (powder works better) (creativity)
  • ½ part almond (creativity)
  • 4 parts frankincense (uplifting, higher realm connections)
  • ½ part mistletoe (creativity, fertility)
  • ½  part rose hips or petals (creativity)
  • Enough honey to make it stick together

Mix all ingredients except honey together and pound them till they are are well ground and a fine powder.  Once they are all well mixed;  Add enough honey to wet the recipie (about 1/2 to 1 part) and mix everything together with your fingers.  It will get sticky but it should form into balls.  Form into balls and then let them sit a month or so and they should dry up and you can burn them as incense nuggets on a charcoal block (they won’t burn on their own).

Purification Incense (Powder)

An incense for purification of all kinds.  This was adapted from Cunningham’s basic recipe.

  • 2 parts frankincense
  • 1 part white copal
  • 1 part sandalwood
  • 1 part rosemary
  • 1 pinch finely powdered sea salt
  • Few drops lavender essential oil
  • 1 quartz crystal

Mix all ingredients in a mortar and pestle and then burn on a charcoal block. Store in a jar with a quartz crystal.

House Cleansing Incense (Powder)

Works very well!  You should burn it with the windows open!

  • 3 parts cedar (banish hostile spirits, purification)
  • 2 parts benzoin (purification and protection)
  • 1 part Juniper berry (anti theft, purification)
  • 1 part rosemary (protection, banishment of nightmares and hostile spirits)
  • 1 part sage (purifying and cleansing)
  • 1/2 part valerian (enhances purification and protection, although this stuff really stinks…)
  • 1 part cedar (cleansing negativity, creating sacred spaces)
  • 2 parts frankincense (protection, anti-negativity, creating sacred spaces)

Mix all ingredients in a mortar and pestle and then burn on a charcoal block.

Wish Incense (Cone/stick)

For granting your wildest dreams.  Its also good for faerie magic.

  • ¼ part vanilla (real)
  • 1 part tonka bean (skin)
  • ½ part star anise
  • 1 part amber or frankincense essential oil
  • 3 parts sandalwood
  • ¼ part guar gum (binder, add last)

Note: Make sure you really powder the Tonka bean skin; its really kinda tough to work with–but its worth it!

Powder all ingredients very, very finely, adding the oil at the very end of the grinding process.  Once all ingredients are ready, you can add Guar Gum, mixing well. Add enough water to create a firm dough–if you use too much water, you can add more cedar or sandalwood powder.  Once your dough resembles play-dough or sculpey, you can roll out and cut, or shape into small incense cones/blocks/sticks.  Allow it to dry for 1 week and then store in a nice container.  I found this made really nice sticks!

About these ads
 

6 Responses to “Incense Recipies for Bards and Bardic Studies”

  1. cathrynbauer Says:

    Thank you for passing on this important knowledge.

  2. Michele Says:

    Wonderful~ thank you for sharing this!

  3. Eehli Says:

    This is really cool :D Thank you for sharing this information.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 413 other followers