The Druid's Garden

Spiritual Journeys in Tending the Land, Permaculture, Wildcrafting, and Regenerative Living

Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part II: Relationships of Work and Time February 19, 2017

In the US, it seems that the first question people ask is, “what do you do?”  When they say that, of course, they are not talking about how you spend your leisure time, but rather, the work that you do for pay. This is the most defining characteristic of modern lives–because this is tied to the thing our culture holds as most sacred: money.  Money is the only metric that has any real value and the pursuit of money drives all else. If you aren’t working in the workforce earning pay, either the work are doing is devalued (as any stay-at-home parent can attest) or there is something very wrong with you (as in, why aren’t you out there earning money?). This current economic system, driven by industrial mindsets surrounding profit and efficiency, gives us a rather poor metric through which to measure ourselves and our value.

 

Last week, I explored a bit of the history of our current cultural value system with regards to work by examining humans’ earlier relationships with work and time. In today’s post, I’m going to bring us into the present age, and explore some of the issues surrounding modern relationships with our work and how these relationships are tied to underlying cultural value systems of exponential growth, the love of money, and the myth of progress. I do so because our modern relationships with work and money are directly linked to our ability to slow down and engage in anything else meaningful: a spiritual path, sustainable living, communing with the trees, etc. I also want to take a moment to thank so many of you for your incredibly thoughtful and useful comments in last week’s post–I hope we can continue to discuss these issues!

 

Modern Overworking and Productivity

As above, so below

As above, so below

David Graeber wrote a controversial essay in 2013 called “On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs” (this essay is free online, but the site that typically hosts it seems to be down, so I found it on the Internet Archive here if you want to read).  He outlines how, for almost a century, with the rise of fossil fuels and the various technologies, we’ve had reports that increased technology combined with more fossil fuel use would lead us to an increase of leisure time.  In fact, in the 1930’s, John Maynard Keynes suggested that by the year 2000, we could have work weeks as little as 15 hours a week.  For those of you keeping track, this assumption is also wrapped up in the myth of progress that I described in detail in last week’s post.

 

In fact, we are technically capable of working a lot less, at least by modern economic metrics (which, for the purposes of this post, I’ll take at face value). An analysis from Eric Rauch of MIT suggests that today, the average “productivity level” of a worker (that is, how much a worker gets done in a day) has gone up tremendously over the last century, particularly since the rise of modern communication systems.  Today’s workers get done in 11 hours what the average worker in 1950 got done in 40; productivity levels have been on a steady rise for the better part of 70 years.  Graeber reports that as late as the 1960’s, people were still expecting those future 15-hour weeks. Yet, the average work week is now over 50 hours for at least half of Americans (and for some, considerably over 50 hours). So where is all of the extra time going?  Why do we seem to be the most unhappy, and most productive, of workers?

 

Most of this seems to stem from our relationship to consumerism and money, not necessarily from work itself.  Julie Schor, economist and author of The Overworked American: The Decline of American Leisure demonstrated that  workers unions often will nearly always choose higher pay and benefits over shorter working hours. The same is true of non-unionized workers: if faced with the choice between less work and more pay, workers almost invariably choose more pay and give up their leisure time as a result. The idea of not taking more work for more pay seems unfathomable to many. This is, I believe, due to the underlying value system that privileges money and little else combined with an assumption that growth (in wages, in standing at one’s job) is a desirable and necessary pursuit.

 

I have a good example of this from my own life: a few years ago at my previous university position, I was asked to consider stepping into a major administrative role much higher up the food chain so to speak, overseeing a large and growing major. This job offered almost a 40% pay increase from what I was currently making. However, this new job was not appealing to me in the slightest. For one, would take me away from all the things I enjoyed about my job, namely my teaching my students and the discovery I was able to do as a researcher, and replace it with more work I didn’t enjoy. For two, it also meant losing my flexible schedule, working many more hours, and it would require that all my working hours be on campus. Consequently, due to the longer daily working hours, I would have had to deal with rush hour traffic twice a day that I had learned to otherwise avoid.  This meant even less time on my homestead, and in winter months, leaving before the sun rose and getting home after the sun set (think of the chickens!).  And so, I gently declined the position. When word got around that I had declined what was clearly a “step up” in my career, my colleagues couldn’t understand why.  No answer I could give was sufficient. Finally, I came up with the one answer always acceptable to academic audiences: I wanted to focus on my research (that is, I preferred the noble goal of making new knowledge and sacrificed higher pay to do so). Giving people the true answer: that I liked the work I currently did,and that I didn’t, gods forbid, want even more work on my plate or a more restricted schedule, was simply not an acceptable answer and giving it would have considerably harmed my reputation. This is because more money and higher status is always the choice you should make given the cultural value system that privileges earnings above most else.

 

One book that really helped me make sense of this decision to keep a lower paying, lower hour, more flexible position was a book called Your Money or Your Life.  This book puts out, in direct terms, a system for monitoring the relationship between your time and your work and draws clear the distinction between the two.  In a series of exercises, you calculate your “real” hourly wage (not what you are paid, but what you actually make after you subtract work-associated costs, transpiration, transportation time, and the downtime/recovery time that is lost after work that you need to recover from it). It also has you monitor your spending and identify ways in which that spending is or is not in line with your value system. When you do these activities, it really helps you change your relationship with your work and your finances.  I’ll talk more about this approach in my third post on this series–but suffice to say, this book helped change my own relationship with money and made me realize that I made the right decision.

 

Another major issue contributing to overwork is that the current work system intentionally privileges overwork. For one, many people fear losing their jobs such that they have to do whatever their employers tell them to, and will, and that means among other things, much longer hours at lower pay (hence one of many reasons that the middle class is shrinking and pay is stagnant). For two, most workers no longer possess much autonomy over their work, and so the amount of work they do is no longer determined by them. With the rising income disparity, more funding is going to boated administrative positions at the cost of the average and lower-paid workers who then suffer  more administrative oversight (see next paragraph).  Finally, the more “productive” one is compared to one’s peers, the more one is rewarded. For those working hourly rates, the situation is even more dire: extremely low pay per hour requires them to work tremendously long hours at unpleasant jobs to take home a pittance. I think the underlying thing that is happening here is that we are supposed to want to work, we are supposed to want to earn good pay, we are supposed to be growing our salaries and our careers and we should be sacrificing all to do so.

 

David Graeber offers his own interpretation to some of the above: the creation of “bullshit jobs,” primarily of the administrative kind. He describes the new jobs like telemarketing and financial services and the “ballooning” of administration” in many areas. In terms of why this is so, Graeber writes, “The answer clearly isn’t economic: it’s moral and political. The ruling class has figured out that a happy and productive population with free time on their hands is a mortal danger (think of what started to happen when this even began to be approximated in the ‘60s).”  He argues that many people find large portions of the work they do as meaningless, even if they do this work for pay (and often for a lot of it). Graeber notes that the resentment and “psychological violence” that builds up for those doing “bullshit jobs” and is inflicted upon those actually doing meaningful work.  Those who are doing meaningful work are often doing it for less pay, furthering resentment between all involved. A good example of this is the teaching, nursing, or social work professions: all folks engaging in really important work who do it for less pay and over overseen, increasingly, by administrators in bullshit jobs. Whether or not you buy Graeber’s argument, there is no doubt that today, people feel overworked, underpaid, and generally strained–all the while carrying around an unconscious value system that tells them they should keep earning profits.

 

Another piece of this I’ll note is the rise of the super-specialist system. Wendell Berry discusses this system briefly in the early chapters of the Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture. In the specialist model, we have replaced generalist workers that are good at a lot of things and are well rounded (like a small family farmer, handy person, etc) with super specialists who are really good at one thing. Increasingly, we feel the need to go to specialists for every little  thing (finances, health, food, haircuts, you name it). The rise of the specialist system reduces individual autonomy, flexibility, and freedom, requires infinitely more specialized (and in many cases, less meaningful) work.  But I also think that the rise of the specialist system makes us think that we can only be good at one thing (our specialized work) and so we must do that well above all else.

 

I could write more here, but I think my points have been sufficiently made: that workers in today’s system are both products of the system beyond their control (one engineered to make sure they don’t have leisure time), but also often make choices to maximize wealth and thus undermine their own leisure time due to tightening economic circumstances coupled with underlying cultural myths about growth and progress.  This system works such that we are exhausted at the end of the day, and we can’t do much else rather than spend all our time in front of screens pumping advertising that makes us buy things to keep the system chugging right along. Further, we depend on that system and many of us are in serious binds due to economics and decisions we made earlier in life. So now, I want to turn my attention to the costs that this system has on our emotional, spiritual, and physical well being.

 

The Physical Cost of Overwork: Our Nervous System

Physically, the amount of work we are doing, without much downtime and festivity (as explored last week), means that our bodies are less able to handle stress or any serious endeavors beyond just keeping going to our jobs. We begin “living to work” rather than “working to live.” I think the increased productivity levels means that most workplaces are more demanding, fast paced, and intense than even 10 years ago–so when we go, we are working harder, faster, and with less rest. I know in the time I’ve been in the academic workplace, the university is demanding a lot more for a lot less compensation. And this causes us physical harm and daily stress. Additionally, as we age, our bodies are different and cannot always work as much as we want them to. A recent study suggested, for example, that people over 40 are better workers with a three-day work week as opposed to a five day work week.

Stinging nettles support the adrenals

Stinging nettles support the adrenals

 

I’m going to put on my herbalist hat for just a moment and talk about the automatic nervous system, because it helps illustrate a few key things important to this issue of stress and overwork (and for more on this, I point to Hoffman’s Herbs for Stress and Pip Waller’s Holistic Anatomy). The automatic nervous system (which is outside of our conscious control) maintains and governs the vital functions of the body like digestion, circulation, heart rate, and breathing. It has two modes: the sympathetic (fight or flight) and the parasympathetic (rest and digest). Earlier in human history, the sympathetic nervous system was used to get us out of immediate danger (oh noes! A big bear is chasing me!) In this state, anything that’s not immediately needed for survival, including our digestive system, our immune system and inflammatory responses, and our sexual system, are essentially shut down.The problem for those of us living as modern humans in these work-intensive and difficult times is that stress doesn’t work like it did in earlier points in human history. Most stress is not stress we can just run away from and relax—rather, its continual and grating. Feelings of being overwhelmed, overworked, and isolated are three key signs of a continual sympathetic nervous system state. Due to modern demands, we make things worse by pushing our bodies to go even further using various common stimulants (sugar, coffee, caffeine, energy drinks—in fact, caffeine mimics adrenaline in the body). Prolonged stress responses encourage the adrenal glands to produce a hormone called Cortisol into the blood, which again mobilizes stored glucose and fat, suppresses the inflammatory response (how the body can heal from damage), and taxes the liver.

 

If the body continues to face stress, the body responds with what is known as  “general adaptation syndrome” – which is essentially a chronically stressed system—with the adrenal glands releasing all of the cortisone they can for as long as they can. Long-term exposure to Cortisol taxes the liver and can lead to digestive problems, muscular tension, poor joint health, high blood pressure, various reproductive system issues. Eventually, if this goes on long enough, the body is exhausted and suffers what is known as “adrenal burnout” or “adrenal exhaustion.” Our bodies cannot go forever on and on, and at this stage, we have severely decreased ability to deal with stress, severe mental and physical exhaustion, and higher susceptibility to illness and disease.

 

If you are feeling exhausted when you are relaxing, you know that your body has been running in sympathetic mode long term. A few other common signs are waking up tired and not feeling rested even after a full night’s sleep or getting sick as soon as you go on vacation. Because so many people are running on General Adaptation Syndrome, when they finally do get back to a parasympthetic state (say on vacation), they immediately fall ill and feel exhausted—this is feeling the true state of affairs in the body. In 2015, for example, 24% of Americans were experiencing “extreme stress” and general stress levels have continued to rise. Given healing, self care, and downtime, the body can fully heal.

 

I believe that the above information is likely why television and other media are such huge attractions.  Adrenally depleted people cannot muster the energy to do much–getting something to eat and crashing with Netflix is what a lot of folks do at the end of the day because they are physically incapable of anything else.  This, too, is a cost of our work.

 

The Non-Physical Costs of Overwork

Schor notes that the decline of American leisure time has resulted in what she calls “loss of independence.” Likewise, literary figure Herman Mellville wrote in a letter to a family member, “Whoever is not in possession of leisure can hardly be said to possess independence.” The more that our working hours are wrapped up in our jobs or other responsibilities (meaningful or not), and the more time we spend outside of that work as exhausted and adrenal depleted zombies, the less we are able to engage in any meaningful activity that doesn’t have to do with earning a living.  Independence is critical to our success in any endeavor or path beyond our work.

 

The second cost of overwork is wasted potential. This independence, this unstructured time, offers us potential and possibility. We have to determine how we enact that potential, of course, but the potential itself will never be there without the time and energy to do so.  In other words, overworking closes off potential and possibility for us all. Free time is like a bed of soil, freshly prepare for seeds and planting. We can choose to leave it barren or we can choose to cultivate something. But if we don’t even have access to that bed and the energy to plant anything, there is no way anything can grow. I think that humans have the potential for so much–creative gifts and tapping the flow of awen, doing good work in their communities and healing each other, healing the land, spiritual self discovery, deeper understanding–all of the things, really, that make us human.  But we need to the unstructured time to make that a reality.

 

A third thing I think we lose is the ability to learn and grow fully. Having leisure time means you have time to make mistakes, ponder about those mistakes, try some new, experiment, tinker, and so on. This is a really critical part of  learning anything, but certainly, its critical to develop any skill in the bardic art or in homesteading or planning a garden. We have to have time not only to learn, but practice, and on occasion, fail at things so we can get better. When are strained for time, we don’t have the space to do that. Because every bit of time is so precious, failure leads not to introspection but to seeing the time as “wasted” and to frustration.

 

A fourth thing that we lose is the ability to reflect an think carefully  about what is happening in our own lives and in the world around us.  For example,  how many people have you talked to (and maybe this has happened to you) where something major occurs and rather than process it and deal with it, they keep working and never really think about the issue. Maybe this thing is a tragedy and they bury the pain of it, or maybe it is something really wonderful–and neither can be thought about or processed. Losing our ability to be reflective means we don’t integrate lessons and experiences and grow as people. I think this work so critical to us–both in terms of our spiritual paths, but also in terms of our humanity.

 

A fifth thing we lose is the ability to connect with each other or the land. Harried work schedules coupled with adrenal fatigue means we don’t have time for others in our lives: to reach out, to send a card, to have a nice cup of tea by the fire, or to commune with the non-human aspects of the world. It takes time to build and maintain connections, and without them, we are isolated and alone.

 

And I think at this point, I’ve come full circle to the issues that I opened with in my last post: wanting to live in line with my principles and never seeming to have the energy and time to do so.  I’ve explored some of the problems and causes that I think are contributing to these phenomenon (in my own life, in the lives of my friends, and broader for many people).  Next week, we’ll move to the next stage of this process: what to do about it.  In the meantime, friends, I hope you can find some leisure time and enjoy it!

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25 Responses to “Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part II: Relationships of Work and Time”

  1. Moony Says:

    I never realised that our modern, urbanised society could really have such a damaging relationship with the culture of work and materialism – namely, how it creates a cycle of paradox that the average worker can be trapped in. As someone about to go out into the working world herself, it’s probably an early reminder of the need to maintain a balance amid the new stresses the job market brings. I’d love to read your follow-up post soon! Your articles are always so thoughtful 🙂

    • Dana Says:

      I think the paradox is a really nice way to describe it. This series of posts is me working to some resolution of that paradox! :). Thanks for reading, Moony!

  2. Bee Gentry Says:

    This is very perceptive and well-stated, Dana. It’s been true in my own life, I know. After 50 post-college years in the work force meeting publication deadlines, my sympathetic nervous system has totally overwhelmed my parasympathetic. Enough fight or flight, my body says. Time to rest and digest. And if I don’t take that time, I suffer a variety of incapacitating digestive and immune issues!

    Druidry, as well as “Your Money or Your Life”, has helped open my life to the way natural systems function and what really matters. Now, as I finally move toward retirement, it’s easier for me to stop chasing the pot of gold at then end of the rainbow and gracefully seek the richness of a new morning, the sunny sky after a storm, or the bright beaming of a child’s smile.

    Thanks for reminding me!

    • Dana Says:

      Those pesky publication deadlines. I actually really like the academic work itself; I just wish there was a way to not have to have it be so intense and demanding. Everyone that I know is overwhelmed, stressed, and way overworked. And yet, nobody thinks that there is anything wrong, or if there is something wrong, it is a personal problem rather than a cultural one. I’m so glad to hear how your plans are working out, Bee! Do keep me updated with your progress on the farm 🙂

  3. A. Houk Says:

    I know you’re only two posts in, but I’m really loving this series so far!!

    I’ve dreamed of homesteading since the early 2000s and have yet to make it a real reality – we’ve dabbled in herb gardening, food gardening and making some of our own personal care products – but living in an apartment certainly can make things difficult. And for the past year or so, I’ve been fantasizing about working from home. Primarily because I want to be in charge of my schedule and ensure that it allows me time to pursue my interests/passions.

    We moved to Colorado in August and I wasn’t working for several months, which drove me nuts, but I’m now working three days a week (about 20-30 hours/week) and making a lower hourly wage. In some ways, it is ideal. But, as an introvert, the nature of direct-facing customer service still leaves me feeling so drained that pursuing interests (be in language learning, writing poetry, studying Druidry/herbalism or making kombucha) often takes a backseat to just relaxing.

    I’m definitely working to find the sweet spot of work-life balance, and these posts are great reminders that 1) I’m not alone and 2) I’m not crazy. Plus, they’re loaded with great information! Looking forward to the rest of the series and maybe we can all glean some tips or advice from each other.

    • Dana Says:

      Hi A. Houk, thanks for the response! I feel like the balance is critical. For many of us, it is likely not in the 40-60 hour range modern living demands. I keep saying–ok, is there a different way? Like you, I get drained out after being among people (including at work) and love hiding away in my art studio or in the woods after work. I am certainly happy to hear any tips and advice from you on how you are maintaining that balance!

    • Rebecca Says:

      I was an adrenaline junky, not working at high stress was hard to kick… Made me jittery.

  4. astrobuss Says:

    Thanks, Dana! Linked to this post, quoted from it, and commented at https://astrobuss.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/winding-down-the-industrial-era/ .

  5. laurabruno Says:

    Reblogged this on Laura Bruno's Blog and commented:
    This is an important series from Dana and something for some reason I always sensed. I have been very fortunate even pre-TBI and self-employment largely to manifest jobs in which I controlled most of my own time and schedule. It makes such a difference! I work with so many disabled people, and in many cases, health is really about TIME. When we refuse to make conscious course corrections, the body steps in to rescue the soul with justification for already much needed changes. Consciously reclaiming your relationship with time, moving beyond linear time, and recognizing the ability to bend time are among many health saving and health recovering techniques. Recognizing cultural patterns and internalized expactations about time helps in the reclamation process. Thanks, Dana!

  6. Eliza Ayres Says:

    Reblogged this on Blue Dragon Journal.

  7. Kieron Says:

    I, too, find this refreshing and instructive, and applicable to my life. It also helps me escape the “shoulds” that insidiously creep over me. I am relatively lucky: I set my own schedule, have leisure to do so, and am in a good place in my work life. However, others say and think I should be working toward my master’s degree. Okay… maybe I should, but I am being paid more than I ever have been, and am debt free (aside from my mortgage and home equity and a smidge of credit card debt), and I own my car free and clear, and paid off my student loans. Do I take on more student loan debt in the hopes of some future ideal job that may never materialize? I know people who went to school and have masters’ degrees and are essentially personal care attendants or work in retail. And In this era of insane people in power, to give the power structure more control over me? it makes no sense, but the pressure of “Well, what do you want to do 10 years from now?” I wonder if we’ll survive the next 5 years! I haven’t resolved it, but awareness of the myth of progress makes it easier to sift through the garbage and find what is true to me.

    • Dana Says:

      This is the question, right? What do we do that is best for us, and what are the costs that we take on in order to do it? How can we live fully and peacefully and take care of our own needs, while also being part of this system (willingly or not)? I think asking the questions and thinking about possible responses is a good way to start working into these. Even just the assumption that more school/student loans = always better is a good one to start questioning. Thank you so much for your comment!

  8. Talis Says:

    Bless you for this series on work and leisure. Too often when I read ancient stories and the days and weeks long celebrations it spurs awe in me. Im what’s known as a hard worker. And it’s interesting to me the idea of working and playing hard. Why is hardness such an attribute?

    • Dana Says:

      I have some theories on that which I’m going to be sharing in this week’s upcoming post. I think a lot of it has to do with the speed of the whole culture–we don’t really have a lot of choice right now to play and work hard based on some other cultural demands and assumptions. Its more complicated than that–so stay tuned. And thank you so much for your comment 🙂

  9. Rebecca Says:

    I read Your Money or Your Life years ago and it changed everything. My job was very specialized, but I have generalized my skills at home. I have five acres, a small home, chickens, garden, a good forest, and make all sorts of things. I am getting very self-sufficient and away from corporate life. I love my life now, and retired early on a pittance. My life is simple in a way, but varied and enjoyable.

    • Dana Says:

      Thanks for sharing your story! I love the shift to generalized skills. I’d love to hear more about what you are making and growing 🙂

  10. […] Slowing Down the Druid Way, Pa… on The Druid's Garden […]

  11. SLClaire Says:

    Hi, Dana!

    You asked me about my experience with Your Money or Your Life in your response to my previous comment. My husband and I started working the program in 1994, about two years after I quit my position as a research chemist, when we realized that we weren’t managing to live on my husband Mike’s income as we thought we should be able to do. I hated the job and all of the extras that went with it. Falling ill on vacations was a given for me. Eventually I realized I had to quit; the job would kill me if I didn’t. When I quit, several of my colleagues told me privately that they wished they could do the same.

    I’d say it took us six months to a year to get from spending more than Mike made to saving almost a third of his wages. Then we set the goal of retiring him early, following later steps, and were able to achieve that 7 years later, in 2001. We continue to do the program because we don’t have much income (more than enough but not so much more than enough that we can afford not to do the program). However, I think it is now much more difficult, maybe impossible to use the program’s later steps in the way that we did. With the loss of economic growth we are experiencing the loss of interest. This is a rough time for everyone. I wish I thought it will get easier, but I don’t see that.

    Claire

    • Dana Says:

      Claire,

      Thanks so much for sharing. I was wondering about the interest thing as part of that program. There are some assumptions about returns on investment that may not be accurate any longer. I hope things remain ok for you!


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