Tag Archives: chickens and druidry

The Art of Getting Lost in the Woods, or Cultivating Receptivity

I think we’ve all had periods of our lives where we feel like we are moving like a stack of dominoes; we have so many things piled on us that we have to keep going, going, and going. In fact, I had a hard conversation this past week with a loved one, someone who is close to me and sees the everyday patterns of my life.  As part of this conversation, I realized that I had been, since moving to a new job a year and a half ago, literally zipping about. Most of my days were just like those dominoes–falling one after another. As soon as I completed a task I would move onto the next one, hardly taking a breath in between. Since moving and taking the new job, I find myself still settling in, still finding my new rhythms, and trying to fit my usual things into less time and space.  He recognized this in me, and asked me to take a few minutes to reflect on it. I’ve written about this before; our culture demands and glorifies the busification of our lives, the constant moving, doing, and pressing ever forward. We see this not only in the workplace, but in our expectations of our daily lives. I think this is especially true as we grow closer to the Western holiday season, where everything seems to be moving much more quickly than usual. It seems that celebrations and time off would be the perfect time to slow down, but instead, it seems that everything speeds up.

 

Time to slow down...

Time to slow down…

 

So today, I’d like to spend time focusing on the opposite of the hustle and bustle: the importance of observation and interaction through meandering, pondering, and wondering and the benefits of doing this work for our own health and nature-based relationships.  This post continues my “Permaculture for Druids” series, and focuses on some additional work with the “observe and interactprinciple.

 

Projective and Receptive States of Being

One useful way of framing today’s topic of being too busy too often is through two common terms used in many western magical systems: projection and reception. We can frame these two principles like taking a hike in the woods.  The first way to hike is with a set goal in mind: a trail we want to walk, a particular landmark we want to see, mushrooms to find, or some other goal to achieve.  This is the projective way of hiking: we are going to take X trail for X hours and see X landmarks.  We are going out to X spots to find X mushrooms.  But remember: that trail has been crafted by someone else, there are lots of people surrounding that popular landmark and our own plans can be disappointing. Or perhaps, the mushrooms are just not in the spot you’d hope they would be!

 

The protective principle is that of the masculine, of the sun, of the elements of air and fire. Projection in the world means that we are out there, doing something, working our wills and using our energy to enact change.  When we are projective, we are often setting ourselves a dedicated path and following that path; it implies that we have an end goal or destination in mind. This is the place we are in often–making plans, enacting them, working to push things forward, engaging in our work in the world.  Projectivity implies a certain kind of control–we are the actors upon our own destiny.  A projective view suggests that we have the power, and we are using that power to achieve our own ends.  Projectivity is both an inner and outer state–focus, determination, drive, and mental stamina are all part of the inner projective place while our specific actions towards a goal help propel us forward.  While projectivity certainly has its place, it can be rather exhausting if that is all we are doing. (And, I’ll just note here, that I wonder how much of these busy schedules really control us?)

 

The alternative way to hike, of course, is to enter natural spaces with a different kind of intent: the intent of wandering with no set goal, no set time frame, and simply seeing what unfolds before us.  This means that we engage in many activities that don’t necessarily have a positive connotation in our culture (but really should): mulling about, being directionless, meandering, and simply taking our time to smell the roses.

 

In western magical systems, the receptive principle is connected to the feminine energy of the moon and the elements of water and earth. And like those principles, receptivity means being open to those things, especially unexpectedly, that come into our lives–allowing things to flow in, allowing us to offer ourselves up to the experience without a set expectation or outcome. Receptivity means taking time to wander and wonder about things we aren’t sure of, to give space and voice to those things before firmly deciding any course or action or solution.  The receptive principle is all about creating space enough, slowing down enough, and turning off our projective natures, long enough to allow nature to have a voice and to take us by the hand and show us some amazing things.

 

Sometimes receptivity also means sitting back and not engaging in the world or putting off driving forward with plans; other times it means doing what we can and having faith in things beyond our control.  Sometimes, it means that the time is not right and the best thing you can do is wait. A lot of us have great difficulty in surrendering our control and simply trusting forces outside of ourselves to bring things in or waiting for a more opportune moment.  Sometimes, the more we try to make something happen, the less likely that thing will be the thing we really want to experience or the less likely it will actually occur. Receptivity applies both in terms of our own minds (cultivating a curiosity, pondering, wondering, and openness) and as well as in our outer experiences.

 

Trail into the woods....

Trails into the woods….

Since most of us have difficulty in particular with the receptive principle, I’m going to spend the remainder of this post talking through some specific activities with regards to interacting in nature that I think can help us cultivate receptivity, to observe, and to simply interact without a specific goal or agenda in mind. Nature is the best teacher with regards to most things, cultivating receptivity being no exception.

 

The Outer Work: The Art of Getting Lost in the Woods

I remember a warm summer day several years ago when three druids went out into the woods for the sole purpose of exploration. We literally picked a “green area” on the map and said “we wonder what’s there?” We had no set goals, no set timeframe, and a few backpacks of supplies–and off we went. It turned out that we had stumbled upon a recreation area/park that was no longer quite maintained by the township, and we had the place to ourselves.  The road we wanted was labeled “closed” but we went down it anyways and parked along the edge. We found a number of paths that were not exactly clear to walk on, as debris and fallen trees had come down in places.  The wildness of the place really added to the adventure. We found morel mushrooms growing up among the paths (which later made a delightful dinner). We found a downed sassafrass tree and used a small hand saw to harvest the roots; we also found a huge patch of stoneroot for medicine.  The further in we went the further in we wanted to go. And, best of all, we druids literally found a small stone circle there, tucked away in the forest along one of the abandoned path. We spent time in the circle, amazed at finding such a treasure.  This day, and the magic of it, remains firmly tucked in my mind as one of the most memorable and pleasurable I had had while living in Michigan for the simple fact that it was an adventure and none of us had any idea what we might find next.

 

When I say the art of getting lost in the woods, I’m not necessarily talking about physically getting lost (although that may also happen) but rather, to allow ourselves to get lost in the wonder and joy that is the natural world.  Getting lost with no set direction and seeing where nature leads.

 

I believe one of the best activities cultivate an open, receptive state is to enter the woods (or other natural area) with no set plans, agenda, or time frame–just like my story above describes. That is, to simply let the paths and forest unfold before you, to lead you deeper in, and to allow you to simply be. To slow yourself down, to make no plans, and to enter with an open mind, heart, and spirit. The key to all of this is to cultivate a gentle openness that is not in a rush to get somewhere, not on a time frame, and certainly not out to find something specific. The more that you try to project, the more that your projection frames your experience rather than nature and her gifts.

 

This is especially a powerful practice if you are able to go somewhere entirely new. When we visit new places, our minds are opened up to new ways of thinking, new experiences, new patterns, and new ways of being.  Find somewhere new, even if its local, and explore that place.  Even better–go to an unfamiliar ecosystem and give yourself a few days to explore it.  For example, if you a mountain-and-forest person (like I am), the rocky shore, lowland swamp, or sandy desert would be wonderful new spaces that could help you cultivate receptivity, observation, and peace.

 

If you are going more local, my favorite thing to do is pick a “green spot” on the map, show up there, find a trail, and begin walking (if its a very secluded area where getting lost might mean I don’t get found for a long time, I might get a park map, but often, I find a map itself is too constraining and instead focus on trail marking).  Sometimes I will go out wandering by myself, and other times, with friends.  A compass or finding your way techniques (like those discussed in Gatty’s Finding Your Way Without a Compass or Map) are necessary.  Just use your intuition and go where you feel led to go.  Bring along a hammock and tree straps if its a warm day–you’ll be glad you did!

 

I have also discovered the usefulness of “river trails” for this kind of activity.  This is where a river will decide where it wants to take you and how fast you will go.  For one, if you are used to being on the land, the river or lake offers a very new and delightful perspective.  For two, the river has a path of its own, and you are simply along for the journey of where it plans to go.  A long weekend with a few nights camping on the shore can be a wonderful way to allow nature to lead you in new directions and to new experiences.  The last river trail I did (which was a half day excursion on the Conemaugh river) allowed me to see three bald eagles–the first I had ever seen!  A gift indeed!

 

Unexpected mushrooms!

Unexpected mushrooms!

I’ll also note that winter is a really lovely time to do some of this work.  Put on your wool socks and warm clothes and just go.  If there is snow, you never have to worry about getting lost anywhere as you can simply follow your own trail home (and see the entire journey from a new perspective).  Winter and snow offers its own unique insights and lessons.

 

Sometimes, perfectly good trips are ruined by my strong desire to find some tasty mushrooms (and I have my mushroom eyes on, rather than just cultivating an openness of spirit and excitement for the journey).  Then, all that I do is look for mushrooms and feel disappointed when I don’t find them, rather than just enjoying my trip into the woods with no set purpose in mind.  The best times are when I go into the woods not to find mushrooms but simply to enjoy the journey (and then really unexpectedly come across a boatload of mushrooms).

 

Nature always has things to teach when we open spaces for her to do so, when we take time to get lost in the woods.  It makes it easier if we cultivate this through relinquishing our own control and simply taking the time to experience and explore new spaces with an open mind.

 

The Inner Work: Cultivating Openness and Curiosity

The inner landscape, too, greatly benefits from this same kind of “open space” that is free of both our own self-directed activities as well as other people’s words and ideas. Obviously, the material above on getting lost in the woods is of deep benefit to our inner landscapes as well.  But also of benefit is the simple act of inner pondering, wondering, and rumination.

 

Cultivating openness

Cultivating openness

I think the key here is cultivating openness. And I stress the word cultivation here, because, culturally and educationally, we are quick to make up our minds and stick to it and be in a perpetual protective state.  There is real value in withholding judgement, staying open, and gathering in more information that we initially think we need.  Continuing to ask “what if?” is a good way to start this process along.

 

There’s a lot of value in rumination, in simply thinking through things, wondering, and not settling on any one thing too quickly. Open and boundless spaces allow for creativity and awen (divine inspiration) to flow. Pondering is useful, in that it allows us to spend time asking “what if” over and over again until we reach an idea that we are satisfied.  One of my best teachers, Deanne Bednar of Strawbale Studio used this technique a lot as she taught natural building–she would take time to simply ask the students questions, come up with possible solutions, and ask for more until the class had exhausted many possibilities–only then would we move forward with a particular design decision or solution to the building problem we were facing.

 

Journaling and free association activities can be a great way to engage in pondering, as can discursive meditation on an open topic or theme.   Even conversations with the right kind of person, an open minded person who asks good questions and questions assumptions, can help you cultivate openness and receptivity. I use all of these often.

 

In permaculture design, this openness and receptivity is a very important part of the process. We are encouraged to spend a full year observing and interacting with our surroundings before completing a design and modifying any space–and it is really good advice.  Making plans to quickly leads to half-thought out designs. It is through the gentle time spent in nature, observing and pondering, and through focused meditation on key topics, that we might have the ability to craft and create designs that help change the course of our own lives, and our communities, for the better while regenerating our ecosystems around us.  While I think we are all pressed to act, acting too quickly can be worse than acting at all.

 

Finally, I want to mention briefly about screens, since they have become so pervasive and all-encompassing. Screens have a way of bringing in everyone else’s projections–and they literally project them into you.  Cultivating openness and curiosity means, for a lot of folks, seriously limiting screen time (try it with an open mind!)

 

Balancing Receptivity and Projectivity

The key to getting lost in the woods and finding your way back again is finding a healthy balance between receptivity and projectivity and understanding when we need to take control and when we need to surrender it.  I think when people think about doing the work of regeneration, of permaculture practice, of sacred gardening and the many other things I discuss here on this blog, they think about their own actions and plans. However, I have found that sacred healing work in the world, through permaculture practice or anything else is about the interplay between projectivity and receptivity, that is, between ourselves and nature. That is, while we are often those who make plans and initiate changes within a system (a garden, an ecosystem, a home, a community, etc) but also that we observe, creatively respond, and reflect upon what happens beyond us. We have to work both with enacting some changes, and also sitting back and simply observing what happens.  We have to be willing to receive nature’s messages and intentions before setting any of our own.

Chickens and Sustainability

Chickens as part of a sustainable system.

Raising chickens has become an activity of growing importance within permaculture/sustainability movements.  Most backyard chicken owners raise their birds for eggs, meat, companionship, manure, happiness, and natural pest control.  Chickens can form one piece of a larger sustainable system–and I want to stress that when thinking about sustainable transitions, we need to think in systems, not in solitary activity. Its all about how the pieces fit together as a whole and how each piece fits together (for more information on how to think in this way, see Thinking in Systems or Gaia’s Garden).

Our chickens, week 10

Our chickens, week 10

Chickens can serve a lot of functions in a backyard homestead – their manure is excellent for your garden. You need to compost it down first; it is too nitrogen rich when it first comes out of the chicken and will burn plants if directly applied. I especially enjoy the fact that chickens are like “living composters”; I throw my food scraps to them and they break down that food in a matter of hours, leaving wonderful droppings (and they are wonderful–wait till you see your plants growing in composted chicken manure!)

Chickens also provide excellent pest control.  I let my chickens roam free in the garden during a lot of the year to scratch and eat bugs.  They eat slugs, squash beetles, potato beetles, earwigs, Japanese beetles, and many more. And what do they do next? Turn it into glorious manure!

Chickens can also be used to turn soil and till the ground.  Place them in an area that has been planted with green manure like winter rye, and watch them scratch and peck!  In less than a week, they will have mowed down your green manure and you’ll be ready to plant (this is seriously exciting stuff, especially if you work 1600+ square feet of garden by hand like I do!)

Chickens are wonderful companions and bring happiness to your life. I have had chickens throughout my life, and I have always found them to be wonderful companions. Their gentle spirits and calm natures bring peace and tranquility as you watch them go about their chicken-ey business. I have found few things as peaceful as sitting nearby while my peeps scratch in the dirt in my organic garden and take dust baths! Free ranging chickens are so happy with life–give them a few slugs and you’ll watch them experience bliss.

Perhaps the most obvious uses of chickens are for eggs and meat.  And certainly, they can provide either in abundance!  Our current flock is a laying flock, so we won’t be eating them. But they will faithfully lay about 200 eggs each, per year, once they start laying (which is around 26 weeks old).

 

The Lessons of the Chicken

Chickens have many lessons for us, if only we heed them. Chickens spend much of their time observing and interacting with nature–they miss very little.  Yet their focus isn’t always on survival, a good dust bath, nap in the sun, or simply jumping up on a lap to be given attention is all things that they enjoy. We, too, need to focus not only on our survival, but also remember the simple pleasures in life.  Chickens aren’t waste-oriented creatures; everything that they produce is useful, from their droppings to their eggs to their feathers.  So too, should we strive to live in harmony with nature and be producers, not just consumers.

Running flock!

Running flock!

 

The Story of Our Current Flock

We ordered our four baby peeps way back in January of last year to be delivered in mid-July.  I had chickens as a child, and I wanted to make sure I got some of the breeds I wanted.  Because we wanted layers, I also wanted to have my peeps sexed. You can get peeps locally at your feed supply store, but they aren’t always sexed, and often are quite a bit older (and not always very well socialized).  A lot of mail order chicken places ship chickens in lots of 25 or more, which is way too many for the typical homeowner.  We could easily have a flock of 25 on our land, but we have no need for so many!  So I ordered chickens from mypetchicken.com, who had a wonderful selection of peeps and could ship as few as 3 standard-sized peeps (or 5 bantams). I ended up with 2 standard sized chickens and 2 bantams.

In the days leading up to the peeps’ arrival, I built a cardboard brooder in my garage.  This included making an enclosure from some salvaged cardboard boxes, several small food dishes made from paper egg cartons, a small waterer, pine shavings to keep them sanitary, and a heat lamp to keep them warm.  There are lots of great directions online for how to build such a brooder and keep your peeps warm and happy.  And nearly all of this can be made from repurposed/salvaged materials.

Peeps in their travel box!

Peeps in their travel box!

The day before the peeps arrived, I contacted my post office to let them know that they would be coming so that I could go and pick them up.  The peeps came in a small hay nest box  which kept them warm and safe.  Since day-old peeps need to be kept at 95 degrees, the hot days of July were perfect for this!

Its been amazing to watch them grow as the weeks and months go by–they were scared and unsure when they first arrived and huddled together in your hands. Now they are bold, friendly, roaming and free!  I’m ending this blog post with some photos week by week so you can get a sense of how fast they grow.  They have become a flock of lovely ladies, pecking and scratching, each one with her own personality.  They are friendly and active, and have already, in their 11 or so short weeks of life, made such a positive impact on our lives.

Here are some more photos of the peeps as they grow up!

Peeps. Day 1

Peeps. Day 1

Lentil, Day 1

Pinto, week 2

Lima, week 3

Lima, week 3

Peeps Foraging, Week 3

Peeps Foraging, Week 3

Peeps getting bolder, week 5

Peeps getting bolder, week 5

Lovely lentil, mostly grown up!

Awesome pinto, getting so big!

Awesome pinto, getting so big!

Lima Bean is a Lap Chicken!

Lima Bean is a Lap Chicken!

Azuki Preening!

Azuki Preening!