The Druid's Garden

Spiritual Journeys in Tending the Land, Permaculture, Wildcrafting, and Regenerative Living

Permaculture: Design by Nature and the Magic of Intentionality September 25, 2016

I’m sure each one of us have had times where we hadn’t through though something, the thing happened, and it took a direction we hadn’t intended it to take. A little bit of forethought could have made all the difference, perhaps turned a failure into a success. My early attempts at gardening were like this–I didn’t have a plan, I put seeds in the ground without knowing how tall or wide the plants got, and then they came up and things went wild quite quickly!  Sometimes, serendipity took over and I had great successes, if I could manage to weave my way through the thicket of tangles to the harvest. Other times, my plants were crowded out or strangled by each other or my harvest only lasted for a short time. What I learned, through permaculture and organic farming courses was this: a well thought out plan maximizes your yields, minimizes your time, and creates beautiful spaces. I started creating plans, working with nature, and suddenly, my gardens greatly improved!

 

Patterns of nature in a thistle!

Patterns of nature in a thistle!

When people talk about permaculture, they talk about it as a “design system.” One of the definitions of permaculture I work with goes like this: “Permaculture is a design system, rooted in patterns of nature, that helps humans restore and regenerate ecosystems while providing for their own needs.” What does it mean to be a designer? What do we do when we “design?” Why do we care so much about design? And how can design”in a permaculture sense be woven into our other spiritual practices? In this post, we’ll explore the principles of design and  magic of intentionality as two of the cornerstones of the intersection between permaculture, and nature-based spiritual practice.

 

A lot of us feel really lost and confused with what’s going on in the world.  We feel very reactive rather than proactive.  We feel like we need to keep responding to things coming at us, rather than intentionally addressing, in advance, our own circumstances.  Things move so quickly, stuff happens, and we find ourselves always trying to keep our balance. Its the nature of things, you might even say, its by design–just not our own. As a culture, we focus on problems, not on responses to problems–we are always hearing and focusing on everything that is going wrong.

 

But, what if we could reverse those scales a bit, and begin by designing our own lives and designing our interactions with the world?  That’s essentially, what a big part of permaculture is about, and why we use the concept of design. The idea of design, of intentionally and thoughtfully planning in advance, can be of great service to all of us. Design gives us power, in the sense that it gives us a plan to address problems we see. If more of us were able to take the energy we invest in problems (reading about them, experiencing them firsthand, etc.) and turn that into designing responses and enacting change, our world would be a very different place!

 

Design and the Flow of Awen

There are a lot of fields and practices that use design in some way, and if we are going to dig into what permauclture design is and why its useful to us as druids and others on nature-centered paths, let’s start with a few definitions. Merriam Webster Dictionary suggests that to design is to:

  • to plan and fashion artistically or skillfully
  • to plan and make (something) for a specific use or purpose
  • to think of (something, such as a plan) : to plan (something) in your mind
  • to form or conceive in the mind; contrive; plan:
  • to assign in thought or intention; purpose:

From these definitions we get a few key pieces: design includes the practice of planning, in the mind or on paper, for some purpose.  Design is about goals–what we set in advance and bring into being. We use our minds, our creativity, our artistic skill, and the powers of observation to conceive of some kind of plan, which we can then execute and adapt as necessary. Part of this design work is, of course, setting intentions and following through with those intentions.

 

There’s also, implicit in these definitions of design, that design isn’t simply about planning ahead, but rather, that there is an art to the process.  Creativity, the flowing of awen, must be part of our designs. Designs in permaculture aren’t just simple plans, they are creative responses we can use to better adapt human needs to natural ones.  In this sense, it ties to the entire line of bardic arts–those of working with the hands, with the mind, with the flow of awen to design spaces, places, communities, and more.

Natural Building Inspired by Nature's Patterns and Designs

This flow of awen comes, in permaculture, and in druidry, from the living earth herself.  Patterns in nature teach us patterns we can replicate in our more well-tended spaces.  Principles in nature teach us principles we can encact in our homes and lives.  Nature, then, is the ultimate designer and teacher: all that we can hope to do, and do well, is replicate her understandings.

 

Design and Magic of Intentionality

Further, in druid practice and other earth-centered spiritual practices, I think we can also tie design directly to the concept of intention in the magical sense of the word.  You often set “intentions” when you begin a ritual–the goals for the ritual, why we gather, why we open the space. Intentions help us direct activity and actions–these are things we want to accomplish. In magical work, we often leave the designs itself to the universe/spirits/diety/etc. We set intentions, raise energy, and send it out. But in permaculture, we take a more focused hand. Designs give us the plans that we need to move forward in collaboration and communion with the living earth.

 

I’m not saying that inteintionality and design are the same: they are not.  But I am saying that they are related acts, and come from the same place in the heart: the desire to accomplish good in the world, and to enact positive change.

 

Nature’s Designs

Nature's designs....

Nature’s designs….

The other side to permaculture, of course, is that it is a design system that replicates the many patterns and connections already present in the natural world. Whether you believe in higher hands guiding natural development or simply in evolutionary processes doesn’t really matter–what matters is that nature has an incredible wealth of information to teach us, patterns to show us, if only we are ready to see them.

In Permaculture Design, we use nature’s designs in at least two ways:

 

Conceptually, we design using principles and patterns in nature.  This means that we try to replicate the natural processes that already occur: designing with ecological succession in mind (I design for 100 years, not 1!), trapping and using existing energy flows, designing polycultures (groups of diverse plants) that support each other, and so on.  When we look to nature as our master designer, what we create is more effective.

 

Visually, we design using patterns in nature.  A leaf keyhole pattern in a garden means maximized space and beauty; a wave pattern is visually asthetic and offers many edges and margins; a spiral pattern replicates ancient truths.  We visually create designs rooted in nature and that replicate her patterns.

 

What are the Design Principles?

In the tradition of many hermits, one day in the early 1970’s, Bill Mollison got fed up with society, went into the forest, spent a lot of time observing and simple being present, found wisdom there, and came out with his first draft of the design principles. Of course, as I wrote about in an earlier post on this series, Mollison was giving a new treatment to ancient truths. The design principles are, in essence, those small lessons that nature has taught humanity over and over again, its quite and yet profound way.

 

I see them a lot like lights and markers along an otherwise dark path—we stumble in the dark, but the light of the principles helps guide our way. But to me, the design principles are more than just “design” principles—they are principles for living and being in the world. I use them from everything from themes for discursive meditation to mantras for daily living—here are three ways they can be used:

 

Wave Pattern in Garden

Wave Pattern in Garden

Good Decisions. First and foremost, the design principles help us make better, smarter decisions that are earth-centered and earth-honoring. When I’m deciding how to do anything, the principles are there, helping me guide my decision. For example: I’m faced with the prospect of a bunch of leftover food after an event on campus. The design principles offer some simple solutions through “produce no waste” or “waste is a resource.” How then, can I turn this waste into a resource? Take it home, compost it, feed it to a friend’s chickens, and so forth.

 

Good Design. Of course, beyond immediate life decisions, the design principles offer us much in the way of good design. I’ll be going into the principle of design more in an upcoming post, but in a nutshell, one definition of design is, “purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object” (Dictionary.com). This is to say, if we use the design principles for good design, we can live our lives and create/inhabit our spaces with intention and forethought in an ethical, nature-centered way.

 

Meditation Mantras. The third way the design principles work (at least for me) is as mantras for meditation. Deep meditation and reflection upon the nature of the design principles can lead to a more robust understanding not only of how to use them in your life, but in interacting and understanding nature. For example, “use the edges and value the marginal” leads us to understand nature’s patterns but also my own spiritual practices.

 

Designing the Inner and Outer Realms

What I love so much about permaculture as a system of design is that it can be applied just about anywhere.  Just as the permaculture ethics (which I wrote about in the last post in this series, and in the distant past) can be applied to both inner and outer work, so too, can the entire permaculture design system be applied to both our inner and outer realms.

 

Here’s what I mean: one permaculture design principle, which we’ll talk more about next week is: observe, interact, and intuit. This principle is exceedingly useful in considering for our outer landscapes, in that we can observe through the seasons to come to an understanding about how to create beautiful and regenerative spaces. We can observe the flows of nature and energy, note the challenges before us, and pay attention to the changing light, heat, and flows to understand the best approach to developing and regenerating this particular piece of land.

 

Leaf Patterns

Leaf Patterns

But the same principle can be equally effective on the inner landscape: we can step back from ourselves and observe our feelings, our interactions, our inner realms–and this can be deeply useful in our own healing and growth as human beings.  In fact, each of the permaculture principles of design, which I’ll be talking about quite soon in my own druidic way, can function on the outer and the inner–both as a way to design outer functional landscapes of any kind (cities, communities, homes, gardens, farms, campuses, etc) but also work deeply within our inner landscapes.  This series will weave between those two aspects of permaculture as a practice and a system of design.

 

Conclusion

Design offers us a kind of compass and roadmap for the journey ahead.  It takes the guesswork out of things, and instead, helps us plan carefully and effectively before enacting those plans in a meaningful and ethical way.  Design connects directly to patterns in nature, allowing us to carefully understand and replicate those patterns in our own inner and outer landscapes. As simple as design  is as an idea, the actual practice of design takes a bit more work.  In our next post (next week) we’ll explore the design principles as they weave through the four elements and continue to spiral inwards into understanding the relationship of permaculture and druidry.
PS: After posting this, I learned that yesterday Bill Mollison, one of the founders of Permaculture, passed from his earthly body.  I am delighted to be sharing some of his wisdom with you, and I want to take a moment to honor the work that he has done, and the movement he has created.

 

A Druid’s Primer on Land Healing Part IV: The Process of Unfolding March 13, 2016

For the last month or more , we’ve been exploring the nature of land healing and we will continue that journey over the next few posts.  I’ve been doing this work intuitively for a very long time, and its taking time to unfold from my mind and spirit through my fingers and into written form!  In the first post in this series, we explored the different kinds of “healing” work that we could do both physical and energetic. In the second post, I shared the two kinds energetic healing through a visit to two sites – boney dumps (energetic healing) and fracking wells (palliative care). The last post examined what we mean by “energetic” in energetic healing.  Starting with today’s post, we are into the “how to” part of this guide–methods, rituals, ceremonies, and more of energetic healing. Today’s post explores the first of the magical practices for land healing – the process of unfolding.

 

The Preliminaries: Magic, Power, and Hope

The Promise of Healing

The Promise of Healing

Magic as a means of enacting physical changes upon the landscape has been around as long as humanity, and it wouldn’t have survived in such a multitude of ways and settings if there wasn’t something to it, something that worked. For a discussion of what magic is and why it works, and for those wanting a sound introduction to magical philosophy from a druid perspective, I’d suggest John Michael Greer’s Druid Magic Handbook as well as his Inside a Magical Lodge book (which is one of his most fantastic, if under-read, books). Any of the works of Dion Fortune are also very good for this (her novels are especially approachable). You don’t need these magical theories, but I find that they are very helpful for deepening your own understanding.

 

Whatever your philosophy on magic, the important thing is this–despite all of this destruction that you are bearing witness too, all over the lands–you are not powerless. We must shed that sense of powerlessness if we are to help the land heal at all.  An inner sense of empowerment is particularly critical for land healing work–if you go into the work saying, “I’m not going to make a difference, but I’m going to do this anyways” then you infuse your work with “I’m not going to make a difference.” If you go into it with the attitude of “I’m going to help heal this land” then that is what you infuse your work with. This is not to say that you can’t feel anything else–we are hit with a range of emotions when we see lands in need of healing. Those are human, feeling responses, and they too can be channeled into the work at hand. I would be more worried if you didn’t feel anything (and so many people don’t!)  What I am saying, however, is that the defeatist attitude of “I can’t do anything” is not one to bring with you into the healing work.

 

I want to say one more thing here concerning the preliminaries–anyone, anywhere, can do this work. You can be brand new to this work, to being a druid or new to walking any other earth-centered path, spiritual or otherwise–and that doesn’t matter.  What matters, here, is a willingness to learn, to grow, and to engage in the work of healing.

 

Step One – The Process of Unfolding: Deep Listening

The first step in any healing work–energetic, physical, or palliative–is to pay attention to the needs and messages of the land. You might think about this listening process as similar to building any other friendship. Let’s say you meet someone on the street and you get talking. This person appears fairly run down, old coat, worn gloves, possible chronic illness, and so on. You wouldn’t immediately give this  person $20 out of sympathy or a new set of gloves–perhaps she doesn’t want those things, or need those things, or perhaps you were mistaken in your assessment. The only way you can know for sure is to actually get to know this person and see if there is any actual help you can provide that is appropriate and reasonable. Lands, especially damaged lands, need the same kind of respect. They won’t automatically “like you” and be open to you; assuming what they need before actually finding out is a real problem.  In fact, many lands are quite the opposite–they have been actively harmed by humans and are very closed off to human activity. So the question is–how can you build that friendship?  How are you any different than others?

 

This first step is directly connected to both druid spiritual practice and permaculture design and represents a synthesis between them. On the side of druid practice, one of the very first things new druids often do is to to spend observing nature. AODA teaches this in two ways through spending time in nature in stillness and in focus. These ways of observing (which I blogged about in detail last year) help us see, on the physical landscape. But there is also the matter of observing with your intuitive senses, those beyond the original five (see Deep Listening, below).

 

Light through the trees--a sign.

Light through the trees–a sign.

Permaculture design also provides a similar suggestion to druid practice; the first design principle in permaculture being to observe and interact. Before we do any physical regenerative work on a site, we must first observe and interact with that site to understand it so that we are able to work with nature’s flows and rhythms. As a permaculture designer, this would happen through what we call site analysis and assessment–where we’d look at the wind, rain, slope, ecology, light, pollutants, and so many other features. As an energetic land healer, this assessment still takes place, but through deep listening.  In permaculture design, the recommendation for observing and interacting before making changes to the landscape is a full year.  The idea here is that we can’t get a full sense of the land or what changes would be best if we don’t spend time first understanding it in all its cycles and seasons–and this is wise advice for land healing. I don’t think that this longer time frame is unreasonable for land healing either in many cases, truthfully, and we can learn much from understanding that speed is not ideal in most cases (we’ll look at one case where it is critical in an upcoming post, however). I wouldn’t prescribe any set time for the process of deep listening as a land healer, but recognize that this first step may likely not happen in one sitting :).

 

Deep Listening. To begin the healing work then, we need to do deep listening to the land on the inner planes and outer planes (please see my my posts on tree workings for additional specific methods of doing this deep listening). This deep listening to the needs of the land is critically important for the healing work you are going to undertake–what does the land want and need? How can you best serve the land? The question of how to go about this healing is an important one. Depending on how long you’ve been on this path, and what your own gifts are, you may not need any advice in this area. But for those of you who are newer to this work and are still developing your gifts, there are many ways to listen, and here are a few of them:

  • Gut feelings  and inner knowing. All of us have “gut feelings”, although the nature of them depend on how much we’ve honed that intuitive gift.  Sometimes, when I meet new land that is in need of healing–and in want of that healing–I get a strong gut feeling about it. I just know what I am to do, its like it unfolds from within. I won’t immediately act on it, but rather check it with other methods of deep listening.
  • Listening on the outer planes. Deep listening involves listening with both your ears and your soul. Just like you were sitting with that person you met, listen to the sounds and the silences of the landscape. The silences are just as important as what is said. This is particularly true as the silences of the natural world are descending on the landscape–what sounds should be there but are not there? What else do you hear or not hear?
  • Other Senses on the Outer Planes. When we listen to someone, say, a friend who is telling us of his suffering, we don’t just listen with our ears.  We look at them, we may use our sense of touch or any other senses.  Your other physical senses are also part of this deep listening work.  By this, I suggest paying attention to the plants, animals, waters, wind, birds, etc.  Walk around the site and observe.  Sit still–for at least 30-45 min–and observe. The land can speak through many forms–pay attention to all that you see.
  • Listening on the inner planes. Deep listening involves listening with both your ears and your soul. There are many strategies for inner listening, and I gave a number of them in my post on Druid Tree Workings (and I refer you there). One of the best strategies I use for meditation is to sit still, quieting my mind, and opening it to the land and see what messages come. This takes practice–we have to quiet our own thoughts enough to hear the land.  But with pratice, and time, messages will come. Messages may be in many forms, depending on your own gifts–you may hear inner messages, see images (like see you doing something), get a strong feeling, etc. If you are new, it might be that you will learn how to do this through the process of deep listening in this particular spot–so come back often, and know it takes time to develop these senses. Be open to these, and don’t doubt your intuition.
  • Divination. I usually like to check my responses against some form of divination. You can use tarot, geomancy, a pendulum, iChing, ogham, etc.  Use that to ask questions about the nature of the messages you receive.  I like to use this as a secondary approach, to confirm my suspicions.

 

Small, Slow Solutions. The second principle of permaculture that interacts with this step is the idea of small, slow solutions. Land healing is a process of unfolding.  Its a process that may unfold over seasons or years–this is the time under which the land lives–and these are the same cycles and seasons that govern our own lives, even if we have become disconnected from them. What this means is that sometimes, this listening will take time, many visits, and intuition. You may not get a clear sense of what to do on your first visit. The land works on the seasonal cycle and moves at a different pace than you do. Nature heals slowly, but surely, and so it may take time for you to ascertain what, if anything you are to do. Begin by taking the time, the real time, to listen to the land.

 

 

Step 2 – Ascertaining the Nature of Healing Work and Building Trust

The whole point of step one is to take the time to ascertain the nature of the healing work on two levels. First, ascertain the kind of work that needs to be done: Is this physical land healing work? Energetic healing? Palliative care? Should I be doing any work at all? The most important thing you can do, if you are doing energetic work, is ascertain which kind of healing you should be engaging in or should not be engaging in. Part of this is that you need to understand the history of the land in terms of past use by humans, present use, and future use by humans.  Some of my earlier posts in the series looked into this in more detail.  And so, this second step is about now that you’ve done your deep listening, you can ascertain the nature of the work at hand.

 

Sometimes, the path leads away....

Sometimes, the path leads away….

One of the key questions above is the last one I listed–should I be doing any work at all?  In some places, nature prefers to heal on her own and does not want outside help. And if that is what your deep listening has revealed, respecting that boundary, and honoring it, is a tremendous healing step forward for the land. I know this seems counter-intuitive, but I encourage you think about it this way: the land has repeatedly had boundaries crossed by humans without its consent. A human who respects and honors a boundary is a tremendous step forward and shows the land that not all humans are there for exploitation. So if this is the message that you receive, do as is asked, and understand that that, too, is a deep kind of healing work.  It might be that you are asked to walk away permanently, or, perhaps at a later point months or years later, when you return, you are then invited to do healing work.  Walking away can be a kind of test, or it might be the genuine desire of the land at that time.  Regardless, when you are told not to engage, respect that voice and leave.

 

A good deal of this initial work–deep listening, walking away, planning for healing–also functions to build trust between you and the land.  If you are healing land, its because something or someone (most likely humans) damaged it. Trust is critical for real healing to begin.  \Again, I’ll go back to our human analogy here–someone who has been tremendously hurt by others may not want you running up and giving them a big bear hug–trust is slow.  The land is no different: trust must be built.

 

Conclusion

I think some might respond to what I’ve written in this blog post today and say, “wait, there’s no actual magic here!”  Yes, what I’m talking about above is magic, although not in the ceremonial or ritual sense. You can’t be effective in a ritual sense if you don’t do this magical groundwork.  In fact, you’ll notice I’ve been taking quite a bit of posts to get into the actual magical practices of land healing work. This is very much by intention–the groundwork, the preparation, is so key for this. If you don’t do this work, the rituals will not have the effects you want them to have. I think there’s this idea in the earth-based spiritual communities of finding a ceremony or ritual or whatever, from whatever source, that sets the intention and then doing it. You look it up in a book, do the working, and wait for the results. Land healing is not like this and because it’s healing work, it must be done slowly, intentionally, and respectfully.  The magic is in the process of unfolding, and the ritual or ceremony is the final stages of that work in some cases. I also want to mention here that not all healing is ritual or ceremony–there are many other ways of healing, and we’ll be exploring those in detail as well. So if you’ve followed along this far, hopefully what I am saying here is clear to you–next week we’ll delve deeper into the magic of land healing and move onto the next steps! (And yes, the ritual and ceremony are coming, when we are ready to talk about them! :P)

 

An Imbolc Blessing: Energizing Snowy Spaces using Sacred Geometry and Symbolism January 29, 2016

Walking the Imbolc Spiral on the Pond, Imbolc 2015

Walking the Imbolc Spiral on the Pond, Imbolc 2015

In my part of the world, Winter has finally arrived in all of her glory and we are now at Imboc, a wintry holiday of renewal and regeneration (ok, so some people say that Imbolc is the first sign of spring; I consider it a winter holiday and celebrate it as such. There are no real stirrings of spring here till late February or early March when the maple sap begins to run). In today’s post, I’m going to share with you one of my favorite Imbolc activities–unfolding sacred patterns and symbols upon the inner and outer realms, using snow as our canvas. This is a delightful outdoor activity you can do while we have snow coverage during this quiet and most sacred time of the year. For those that are already groaning and saying “Oh no, not more snow!” please scroll to the bottom of this post, to the “Shifting Mindsets” heading and read that first :).

 

A Blessing Within and Without

Fresh snowfall blesses us an incredible canvas upon which to work, to imbue ancient patterns of sacred meaning. The act of creating sacred geometrical patterns, mandalas, or other symbols in the snow allows you to embody those patterns through the simple practice of walking meditation. This act creates not only a blessing from within, where those patterns unfold on the inner planes as you walk them, but also a pattern for blessing our land on the outer planes. This blessing can resonate for weeks, months, and years after the patterns themselves melt away. There are few things we can do in winter that are so simple, and yet so profound.

 

I use the strategies I’m going to be sharing today with you as either the main celebration ritual that I do for Imbolc, or as a large part of that ritual.  The photo above was taken at Imbolc last year (2015). My friends and grove members gathered on the frozen pond at Imbolc, where we created an “unwinding” spiral (counter-clockwise) to unwind and de-stress as we went deeper within.  Then we laid upon the ice in the center of the spiral for a time, and, when we felt ready, we “wound back up” and brought the positive energy, rejuvenation, and clarity to ourselves as we went out. This ritual was conducted when I had just been offered a new job in home state of Pennsylvania and was making a decision that would have life-long ramifications–the act of walking this snow spiral helped clarify, for me, the next stage of my journey. I cried as helped create the spiral, unsure of the best path.  But by the time I had walked back out of that massive spiral, I knew the answer to my decision: I was going home. These practices can be profound, indeed!

 

The Process

Another Imbolc spiral - this one in the sacred circle

Another Imbolc spiral – this one in the sacred circle

So let’s take a look at this process and how it can unfold as a sacred magical practice or ritual.

Your Snow Canvas. First, find yourself a snowy space, of any size.  It doesn’t have to be completely clear–in fact, trees, stones, or other features can add their own beauty to the design.  My favorite place to walk on my homestead was my frozen-over pond, once I was sure it was frozen :).  It was a perfectly flat surface and usually had less snow than the surrounding areas.  My other place that I always traced symbols was my sacred circle.  Since moving to a new state and living in town, I have found that my tiny backyard and even local parks are good spots to do this.  You can even do this on a small porch or balcony.   Even a tiny patch of snow can be used, where you trace the symbol with your fingers rather than your feet.  The snow can be fresh or even starting to melt (as my second photo suggests) Once you have selected your canvas–it is time to select your symbol.

 

Symbolism. There are two ways to go about selecting a symbol.  You can choose to use a symbol for a specific purpose and meaning (see the next section) or you can choose to create an organic symbol from what emerges.  I’ll cover both practices.

  • Selected Symbol. Set forth in your mind the symbol you wish to create. Envision that symbol already traced upon the snow–how large it will be, how you will need to walk to form it, where its boundaries are and spend some time in this visualiation process–it will help you plan things out, especially for more complex symbols. Visualize that symbol in an appropriate color (yellow-green light or white light is a good choice), already there upon the landscape. All that you will need to do, then, is follow the pattern.
  • Intuitive Symbols. The alternative is not to select a symbol at all, but simply to begin walking and see what symbols unfold within and without–I’ve done this numerous times with my eyes closed in an empty field. I also like weaving spirals among the trees in a forest in this manner.

 

Establish Sacred Space, Ground, and Center. As you are ready to begin to create the actual symbol, you can choose to open up a sacred space at this point (I use the AODA’s solitary grove opening for this), but its not always necessary.  Since I usually do these snow symbols as part of a seasonal celebration, I usually will open a space, standing to the side of my selected “canvas” and then include my canvas in the ritual space.  If nothing else, however, you can take three deep breaths, clear your mind, and begin to walk.

 

Walk the shape. The process unfolds from the simple practice of walking.  Walk slow and purposefully.  As you walk, set your intentions for the work you are to do.  It might inner healing or direction (as my opening example suggested).  Or, it might be a strong land blessing.  As you walk, with each step, imbue that energy into the space and into the symbol. Note that you can use the symbol again and again as long as the snow remains on the ground–so it might be that you start with a land healing symbol, and once that’s firmly established, you then walk it again for some personal healing.  Another note here–the more snow, the more challenging walking may be.  I remember a few years ago when I was making one of my pond spirals and it was over a 20″ deep–I had to walk that symbol many times to really have a nice path, but it was a wonderful experience to do so.

 

Return often. Even after you’ve walked the shape, you can continue to come back to it.  A few winters ago, during the year of polar vortexes, I had symbols in the snow that continued to persist for several months!  Each day in the month of February, I would come home and walk the pond spiral before going into the house.  It was a great way to reconnect with my sacred land. You can also rewalk the symbol with fresh snowfall.  The longer the symbol persists, the more energized the space will be.

Vesica Piscis and Cross Design

Vesica Piscis and Cross Design in Recent Snowfall in my backyard in town – this was walked one time.

Symbols, Energy and Intentions

The symbol you choose to create and why you create it is an important part of this process–and like all other magical acts, you should consider this carefully before you begin. When my grove came together last Imbolc to create the spiral, each of us were faced with a major issue in our lives that needed some guidance–and we created the spiral primarily for that purpose.  If you have no direct intentions, then saying you are “open” is a good one!  Also, the land can *always* use a blessing, and certain symbols are particularly good for that.

 

I’m going to now share a few different symbols, primarily drawn from sacred geometry, that can help you see the wide range of symbols available to you.  A few of these images are from a project I’ve been collaborating on with with a friend–a sacred geometry oracle deck and book. I’ll share more about the project as we get closer to the release date–so stay tuned!  But in the meantime, here are some of the symbols:

 

The Pentagram and Pentacle

The Pentagram and Pentacle are symbols over 5,000 years old, used for a variety of purposes, nearly all of them protective in origin. A pentagram is a protective symbol that radiates that energy outward with the five points. A pentacle contains the energy within the five points as it is surrounded by a circle. If you wanted to do a blessing and protective symbol for the entire land, a good choice would be a pentagram. If you had a sacred space you were working on empowering, say, a stone circle or garden, you might choose a pentacle instead to keep the energy contained within that space.

Pentagram (left) and Pentacle (right)

Pentagram (left) and Pentacle (right)

The Spiral

Spirals are my favorite of the snow symbols to create because they can be very easy to create, requiring nearly no thought, and yet profound.  Spirals are likely one of the oldest symbols in human culture, and can be found in paintings in caves and carved in stones as far back as 8000 BCE.  The spiral is representative of many things–to the Ancient Celts, one meaning was the life force or cycle of life.  Spirals reinforce the notion of a cycle or season upon us, and are particularly useful for meditation and walking meditation.  I have found that my snow spirals have a twofold effect–they encourage a deeper awareness and meditative state where I can work out various deep rooted issues, but they also have a profoundly energizing (winding) or clearing (unwinding) energy about them.

Some simple winding (sunwise) and unwinding (desoil) spirals

Some simple winding (sunwise) and unwinding (desoil) spirals

A second kind of spiral, a bit harder to get right in the snow, but no less profound is the one that unfolds from the golden mean. This spiral is created from the Fibonacci sequence (1, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21….).  Entire books have been written on the meaning of this spiral (here is a nice overview)–a most basic understanding of it is that it is what connects the heavens and the earth; we see this spiral reflected in the shape of the Milky Way galaxy all the way down to a simple snail shell.  This same sequence is present in the many ratios of the human body, the notes on a scale, the pattern of a sunflower or the branches on a tree.  When I walk this spiral in the snow, I see it as a connecting spiral, a spiral signifying the universal gnosis, the oneness of all living things.  Walk this spiral and see what unfolds from it.

Golden Mean Spiral

Golden Mean Spiral (with divisions)

The Vesica Piscis

Another symbol for snow workings is the vesica piscis–another ancient symbol drawn from sacred geometry with profound implications.  The vesica piscis is reflected on Glastonbury’s Chalice Well as well as in various religious art and symbolism; it literally means “the bladder of the fish.”  It is a symbol representing unions of many kinds–the union between heaven and earth, between humans and nature, between male and female, between light and dark.  When I create this symbol in the snow, I see it as a promise–a sacred pact between myself and the lands that I serve.  This is the one I walked last week in the snow–a promise of unity with my land.

Vesica Piscis

Vesica Piscis

Awen

Of course, no discussion of sacred symbolism on a druid’s blog can be complete without a discussion of the Awen symbol!  Not nearly as ancient as those above, the symbol still carries profound energy–the energy of creative awakening, divine inspiration, and the arts.  I draw this symbol when I want to bring those blessings into my life or into the lives of those around me.  This symbol is particularly good for workspaces or areas where creativity may flow–consider, for example, using this symbol near a fire pit where the bardic arts are often shared!

Simple awen symbol

Simple awen symbol

 

The Warrior’s Call Symbol

The final symbol I wanted to direct your attention to specifically for land protection is a symbol developed by the pagan group against fracking, The Warrior’s Call. This is is the newest symbol here, but it is being actively used by many around the world to energetically address fracking and protect the lands from fracking activities.  I have found that this symbol is fairly complex for the snow, but its do-able. I have recently used a simplified version of this symbol during our latest snow fall  here in Pennsylvania, near some gas wells, given that I live among the oldest sites of Fracking in the USA.  This symbol works well as an acknowledgement of the land’s suffering and pain. I think this symbol is highly appropriate for snow sigils in areas being fracked or under threat of fracking or other duress.

Warrior's Sigil - Against Fracking

Warrior’s Sigil – Against Fracking

These symbols presented here are few among many, many, many others that you can work with. Be creative and consider what personal symbols or those from the ancient mystery traditions might be most appropriate to your purposes and path.

 

Shifting Mindsets: Embracing the Snow

This special section is for those who want to work snow magic, but have a problem with the snow :).  I am a great lover of winter and the snow, and I find it to be an incredibly magical time of year.  The icicles and shimmery ice on the trees, the gentle snowflakes falling to the ground, the rich carpet of whiteness across the land.  The more that comes, the happier that I get in these cold and wintery months! However, so many people do not share that sentiment. Yet, if you are  are going to do magical workings with the snow, like anything else, you need to come into it with the right mindset.

Small Spiral in Snow

Small Spiral in Snow

For some, winter can be a very hard time due to seasonal affective disorders, managing the snowy weather and work schedules, food insecurity, or other issues. I laid out this fully in my post on cultural challenges surrounding our relationship with snow–if you haven’t read it, its well worth a read.  If you do have serious issues with the snow–I suggest you seek out the root of your discomfort.  Is it that you don’t like driving and have to go to work when its snowing?  That may be an underlying issue with rigid work rules and inflexibility or economic insecurity.  Is it that you don’t like getting stuck in your house with limited food during a storm? Perhaps that’s an issue of food insecurity. Perhaps its the chilling cold–few modern clothes are designed to be sufficiently warm (wool socks have changed my life).  Perhaps, your discomfort isn’t your own, but rather the collective’s continual complaining and demonizing the winter.  We have a copious amount of negative media coverage surrounding natural weather phenomena like snow (a visit to weather.com’s page will demonstrate this in spades–I get stressed just looking at their homepage).  If you are on social media, there’s no shortage of it there either.

 

The problem with all of this negativity wrapped up in snow is that it blinds us to the beauty and magic of this time of year.  And, just as importantly, if you are going to attempt to do the snow workings and sacred activities laid out here–its important to make sure you are putting the right energy into it: loving energy, peacefullness, and goodwill!  As within, so without!

 

Energetic Patterns and Time

This snowy ritual I have shared can be used for an number of different purposes, and can deeply weave patterns of energy into the landscape–both inner and outer. After doing spirals on my frozen  pond for a number of years, I had a druid friend visit me for the first time a few summers ago and he said, “wow, your pond has some spiraling energy going on!” And I just smiled and said, “Yes, it certainly does.” Even after the snow has melted, the energy that I raised in that space becomes part of the energetic underpinnings of the land for years to come. It can be further reinforced with other kind of sacred space, plant, or stone work! The sky is the limit…or perhaps, the snowfall :).

Another shot of the Vesica Piscis

Another shot of the Vesica Piscis